Mammogram Images


Most mammogram images demonstrate many types of findings that are present within the breast, some may be benign while others are malignant. Any abnormalities are cause for further testing or treatment. It is important to adhere to your physician's advice regarding follow-up mammograms, as some findings that may appear to normal can change over time.

The following are images of various types of findings that may lead to further diagnostic imaging tests or biopsies.


Normal Mammogram

This is an image of a normal mammogram that does not require additional short term follow-up. The breasts contain no masses, calcifications, or architectural distortion. Patients with normal mammograms should still adhere to an age-appropriate long-term screening interval that they establish with their health care provider.

Normal bilateral mammogram (bilateral mediolateral oblique, or MLO, views).  This mammogram is coded as a BI-RADS 1 (normal exam with continuation of routine age-appropriate screening)

Normal bilateral mammogram (bilateral mediolateral oblique, or MLO, views).  This mammogram is coded as a BI-RADS 1 (normal exam with continuation of routine age-appropriate screening)



High Breast Density

This is an image of a breast with high breast density. While this image shows a healthy breast, accurately detecting a potential medical problem is more difficult with a dense breast because normal breast tissue (appearing white on a mammogram) can obscure tumors, which can also appear similarly.

Normal bilateral mammogram (bilateral craniocaudal, or CC, views) that is notable for high breast density, which can result in obscuration of potentially significant findings.  States are beginning to require radiologists to notify patients if they have dense breasts.  This mammogram is coded as a BI-RADS 2 (benign exam with continuation of routine age-appropriate screening)

Normal bilateral mammogram (bilateral craniocaudal, or CC, views) that is notable for high breast density, which can result in obscuration of potentially significant findings.  States are beginning to require radiologists to notify patients if they have dense breasts.  This mammogram is coded as a BI-RADS 2 (benign exam with continuation of routine age-appropriate screening)



Breast Cancer

This is an image of a breast cancer. The shape and edges of the tumor are concerning and require further diagnostic mammography and/or sonography with a follow-up biopsy to determine if the tumor is malignant or benign.

Abnormal bilateral mammogram (bilateral mediolateral oblique, or MLO, views) demonstrating branching linear calcifications with superimposed benign calcifications within the inferior right breast.  This was biopsy-proven to be invasive ductal carcinoma.  This mammogram, in conjunction with confirmatory spot magnification diagnostic mammograms, is coded as a BI-RADS 4 (findings suspicious for malignancy - recommend biopsy)

Abnormal bilateral mammogram (bilateral mediolateral oblique, or MLO, views) demonstrating branching linear calcifications with superimposed benign calcifications within the inferior right breast.  This was biopsy-proven to be invasive ductal carcinoma.  This mammogram, in conjunction with confirmatory spot magnification diagnostic mammograms, is coded as a BI-RADS 4 (findings suspicious for malignancy - recommend biopsy)



MRI of Breast Cancer

Video of an MRI of breast cancer (in the left breast but on the right of the image), with multicentric rounded lobules of cancer within the central breast at mid-breast depth as well as left axillary lymphadenopathy consistent with metastatic cancer 



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